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Announcing the series of technical briefs on MAM
We are pleased to share the CMAM Forum series on the management and prevention of Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) and an associated document on standards of research for MAM. These documents are available in English and French and are uploaded to the CMAM Forum website ([www.cmamforum.org]www.cmamforum.org).
  • Management of Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM): current knowledge and practice (Annan RA, Webb P, Brown R)  Link
    This Technical Brief focuses on current principles and approaches to MAM management, highlighting key constraints, gaps in knowledge and areas still lacking consensus. It is intended to inform ongoing debates among practitioners, national partners, donors and analysts on what information and evidence on best practices are currently available, where the gaps are, and priorities for going forward.
  • Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) through nutrition-specific interventions. (Jimenez M, Stone-Jimenez M)  Link
    This Technical Brief reviews current practice and evidence on nutrition-specific preventive approaches to MAM, providing practical guidance for implementers and programme managers, and highlighting gaps in evidence and guidance.
  • Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) through nutrition-sensitive interventions (Mucha N)  Link
    This Technical Brief examines current evidence, knowledge and practice relating to the prevention of MAM through nutrition-sensitive interventions in various sectors. Nutrition-sensitive interventions can improve nutritional outcomes and impact by addressing many of the underlying and basic causes of malnutrition.
And in addition:
  • Standards of evidence for research on ‘what works’ in the management of MAM. (Webb P) Link
    This presents an overview of classic systematic reviews and statistical meta-analyses which form the backbone of scientific assessments of evidence quality around public health interventions. It explains how these approaches contribute to current knowledge on the effectiveness of MAM interventions.
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Annonce : Série de Dossiers techniques sur la MAM
Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer la série du Forum PCMA sur la prise en charge et la prévention de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) et un document associé sur les normes pour les recherches en matière de MAM. Ces documents sont disponibles en anglais et en français, sur le site Web du Forum PCMA (
http://fr.cmamforum.org/)
  • Prise en charge de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) : connaissances et pratiques en vigueur. (Annan RA, Webb P, Brown R) Lien
    Ce dossier technique porte sur les principes et les approches en vigueur en matière de prise en charge de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) et met en relief les principales contraintes, les lacunes sur le plan des connaissances et les domaines qui ne font pas encore l’objet d’un consensus. Il cherche à éclairer les débats en cours entre praticiens, partenaires nationaux, bailleurs de fonds et analystes sur les informations et les données factuelles relatives aux meilleures pratiques qui sont actuellement disponibles, à indiquer où se situent les lacunes et à établir les priorités pour aller de l’avant. 
  • Prévention de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) à travers des interventions spécifiques à la nutrition. (Jimenez M, Stone-Jimenez M)  Lien
    Ce dossier technique passe en revue les pratiques et données factuelles en vigueur relatives aux approches de prévention de la MAM spécifiques à la nutrition, et propose des conseils techniques à l’intention des entités chargées de la mise en œuvre et des responsables de programme, tout en mettant en relief les lacunes en matière de données factuelles et de conseils.
  • Prévention de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) à travers des interventions sensibles à la nutrition (Mucha N)    à suivre
    Ce dossier technique examine les données factuelles, connaissances et pratiques en vigueur concernant la prévention de la malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) à travers des interventions sensibles à la nutrition dans divers secteurs. Les interventions sensibles à la nutrition peuvent améliorer les résultats et les impacts dans le domaine de la nutrition en luttant contre nombre des causes sous-jacentes et fondamentales de la malnutrition.
Et aussi:
  • Normes à satisfaire pour les données factuelles dans le cadre des recherches sur « ce qui marche » dans la prise en charge de la MAM. (Webb P)  Lien
    Ce document présente un aperçu des examens systématiques classiques et des méta-analyses statistiques sur lesquels reposent les évaluations scientifiques de la qualité des données factuelles portant sur les interventions dans le domaine de la santé publique. Il explique en quoi ces approches contribuent aux connaissances en vigueur sur l’efficacité des interventions en matière de MAM.

Issue 171| Dec 12, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue provides updates on new resources since the September 2014 WASHplus Weekly on WASH and nutrition with links to a December 15, USAID webinar; the recently published Global Nutrition Report; presentations at the UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference in India; and just-published studies on stunting, environmental enteropathy, and other WASH and nutrition topics.

EVENTS

December 15, 2014, Draft Guidance for USAID-Funded Nutrition-Sensitive Programming - Link
During this webinar, Richard Greene, senior deputy assistant administrator with USAID’s Bureau for Food Security, will share a two-page draft guidance document that will assist implementers in applying the new USAID Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Strategy to nutrition-sensitive agriculture programs.

November 19–21, 2014, The Second International Conference on Nutrition
(ICN2)
 - Link | Vision statement
The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) was a high-level intergovernmental meeting that focused global attention on addressing malnutrition in all its forms. The two main outcome documents—the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action—were endorsed by participating governments at the conference, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eradicating malnutrition and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all.

November 10–12, 2014, UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference, IndiaLink
The Stop Stunting regional conference provided a knowledge-for-action platform where state-of-the-art evidence, better practices, and innovations were shared to accelerate sectoral and cross-sectoral policies, programs, and research in nutrition and sanitation to reduce the prevalence of child stunting in South Asia.

REFERENCE MANUALS

Global Nutrition Report, 2014. International Food Policy Research Institute. Link | WaterAid review of the Global Nutrition Report
The first-ever Global Nutrition Report provides a comprehensive narrative and analysis on the state of the world’s nutrition. The Global Nutrition Report convenes existing processes, highlights progress in combating malnutrition, and identifies gaps and proposes ways to fill them. Through this, the report helps to guide action, build accountability, and spark increased commitment for further progress toward reducing malnutrition much faster.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Nutrition Efforts: A Resource Guide, 2014. WASH Advocates. Link
This resource guide includes manuals, reports, academic studies, and organizations working on WASH and nutrition. The guide can serve as a tool for implementers and advocates in the WASH/Nutrition nexus looking to pursue and promote integrated programming.

REPORTS/BLOG POSTS

Place and Child Health: The Interaction of Population Density and Sanitation in Developing Countries, 2014. P Hathi, The World Bank. Link
This paper assesses whether the importance of dense settlement for child mortality and child height is moderated by exposure to local sanitation behavior. Is open defecation, without a toilet or latrine, worse for infant mortality and child height where population density is greater? This paper finds a statistically robust and quantitatively comparable interaction between sanitation and population density: open defecation externalities are more important for child health outcomes where people live more closely together.

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Global Nutrition Report: Actions and Accountability to Accelerate the World’s Progress on Nutrition

December 4, 2014

Global Nutrition Report: Actions and Accountability to Accelerate the World’s Progress on Nutrition, 2014. International Food and Policy Research Institute. Full text, pdf Key Points 1. People with good nutrition are key to sustainable development. Malnutrition affects nearly every country in the world. More nutrition indicators need to be embedded within the Sustainable Development Goal […]

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Beyond Malnutrition: The Role of Sanitation in Stunted Growth

November 11, 2014

Beyond Malnutrition: The Role of Sanitation in Stunted Growth. Env Health Perspect, Nov 2014 Full text Author: Charles W. Schmidt An excerpt from the article: Beyond Nutrition – Nutritionists have tried dozens of approaches to prevent stunting, such as micronutrient supplements for pregnant women and children (especially growth promoters including iron, zinc, calcium, and folate); […]

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Understanding the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Nepal, 2001–2011

November 11, 2014

Understanding the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Nepal, 2001–2011: IFPRI Discussion Paper 01384,  October 2014. Full text, pdf AUTHORS: Derek D. Headey (d.headey@cgiar.org) is a senior research fellow in the Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC. John Hoddinott is a senior research fellow in the Poverty, Health, […]

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Reframing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As

October 31, 2014

Reframing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As, October 2014. Full text Robert Chambers and Gregor von Medeazza, Institute of Development Studies. The dominant nutrition discourse concerns access to adequate food and its quality. It now includes food security, food rights and justice, governance and agriculture. Despite many initiatives to assure food access, and growing […]

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Open Defecation Evidence from a New Survey in Rural North India

September 25, 2014

Open Defecation: Evidence from a New Survey in Rural North India. Ecom & Polit Weekly, Sept 2014. Full text Authors: Diane Coffey, Aashish Gupta, Payal Hathi, Nidhi Khurana, Nikhil Srivastav, Sangita Vyas, Dean Spears Despite economic growth, government latrine construction, and increasing recognition among policymakers that open defecation constitutes a health and human capital crisis, it […]

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The intestinal microbiome in early life: health and disease

September 25, 2014

The intestinal microbiome in early life: health and disease. Front. Immunol., 05 September 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00427 Full text Marie-Claire Arrieta, Leah T. Stiemsma, et al. Human microbial colonization begins at birth and continues to develop and modulate in species abundance for about 3 years, until the microbiota becomes adult-like. During the same time period, […]

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Are you still pouring your Post-2015 water investments down the drain

September 25, 2014

Are you still pouring your Post-2015 water investments down the drain? Stockholm World Water Week, September 2, 2014. Full text Presentations by; Hanna Woodburn, Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing; Orlando Hernandez, USAID WASHplus Project; Jane Wilbur, WaterAid; and Corrie Kramer, Plan USA Individual Presentations WASH Pre- and Post-2015 Making an Economic Case for Investing in […]

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Turning Rapid Growth into Meaningful Growth: Sustaining the Commitment to Nutrition in Zambia

September 25, 2014

Turning Rapid Growth into Meaningful Growth: Sustaining the Commitment to Nutrition in Zambia, 2014. Institute of Development Studies. Full text Edited by Jody Harris, Lawrence Haddad and Silke Seco Grütz Zambia suffers high levels of child stunting and is struggling to achieve the nutrition-related MDGs, with significant constraints in the provision of services to address every […]

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